Yale Art Major Has Multiple Abortions As Part Of Senior Project

If we as a society cannot agree upon a definition of Art, that’s fine.

But why then should Society be compelled to subsidize something, if no one can tell us what it is?

Art major Aliza Shvarts ’08 wants to make a statement.

Beginning next Tuesday, Shvarts will be displaying her senior art project, a documentation of a nine-month process during which she artificially inseminated herself “as often as possible” while periodically taking abortifacient drugs to induce miscarriages. Her exhibition will feature video recordings of these forced miscarriages as well as preserved collections of the blood from the process.

The goal in creating the art exhibition, Shvarts said, was to spark conversation and debate on the relationship between art and the human body.

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16 thoughts on “Yale Art Major Has Multiple Abortions As Part Of Senior Project

  1. Weaver

    “Art” is anything attacking a value of Western civilisation, especially if it promotes the “progressive” (progress towards the inevitable – all opposing it are “reactionary” – reacting to the allegedly inevitable) global new world order.

  2. Dostoevsky Post author

    Actually, Weaver, what’s startling is that they really are almost as blunt and open about it as that.

    Google “logocentrism”.

    Ever since Derrida, humanities academics have explicitly seen literary & artistic criticism as a tool in the grand quest to subvert & dethrone logos.

  3. csason

    I guess a lumbar tattoo was just too simplistic..

    I sort of wish I was her lab partner..maybe if I slapped her everyday for a month, and we photographed that..it would be a ‘body/art’ project sufficient to garner a passing grade. Maybe no the A+ she no doubt will receive for her serial murder trick, but at least a C.

  4. roho

    What a sick puppy!…………I will pray for this human as we all should. May the Holy Spirit come upon her ASAP!………..Salvation will redeam her, but the guilt will be ASTRONOMICAL!

    If this is Higher Education…………..Thank GOD!…..For Ignorance.

  5. Andrew T.

    Weaver, let’s not go that road. Whatever farcical excuse for an “education” this tramp (probably, I would hazard, decked out in full young-feminist regalia, rim-glasses and all) has received has corrupted her mind.

  6. Weaver

    Dostoevsky,

    I’m an accountant (who loved economics btw Andrew :P ). I ignored English classes out of a justified fear that it was pure propaganda.

    Because of this, I’m struggling with vocabulary on the subject you mention :P

    New words learned thusfar: neologism, phallocentrism (yes, it’s what it sounds like), différance, quasi-transcendental…

    I would normally cry BS and stop here, but I’ll see if I can’t bring myself to understand this little sophist first.

  7. Weaver

    Andrew wrote:

    Whatever farcical excuse for an “education”

    They call it a university. I call it a brainwashing facility where what to think is taught rather than how to think…

  8. Andrew T.

    Weaver,

    First of all, accountants are MICRO-economists. They deal in small-scale calculation of real transactions, unlike macroeconomists who are theoreticians and are concerned with what level of government interference is appropriate to achieve optimal utility. An accountant who is philosophically an Austrian would not practice his occupation much differently than one who is a Keynesiian, or a Distributist for that matter.

    Secondly, I agree with the assessment of the philosophical and social sciences in universities today as blatantly Marxiist or nihiilist, but I don’t think this applies to English in modern universities, in general. English instruction is difficult to tangent too far from established curriculum, and your primary reading is going to be founded in classic, established texts. I doubt an English professor is going to assign you the Vagiina Monologues.

    All told, I think that the basic concept of a university can be salvaged. I’ve had professors that were just decent, frankly normal people who taught me adequately in a particular subject. I’ve had some others who have just uttered unabashed Marxiist slop. When a professor such as Dr. Hans-Hermann Hoppe is threatened with eviction from his university merely for stating the a-priori fact that homosexuals have higher time preferences, while anti-human absurdity such as this “exhibit” is allowed to pass muster, though, you know it’s time to radically and severely restructure formal education back into what it once represented.

    P.S. This word filter is playing games with me.

  9. Weaver

    I took several extra econ course and used to debate trade theory. Well, to be more specific I debated it twice, after that there wasn’t much left to argue. At the time I was a laissez faire protectionist, but I’ve since seen the errors of laissez faire.

    I was assigned a book in an English class that fit the stereotype of anti-West brainwashing so well it could have been one of Dostoevsky’s parodies. It was assigned to all of the English classes that semester I believe, though it provoked enough of a reaction that it was removed the next semester.

    And of the readings assigned to me was one telling me how it was natural for men and women to abandon their children at the age of four and for the parents to seek out new mates now that the child was able to fend for himself.

    I learned how to write tolerably well in Business Writing class… Somehow English class was too busy brainwashing us to get into something so trite and… ugh, useful.

    Outside the soft sciences, universities are very good. I include economics in the soft sciences…

    I look forward to online universities improving so that young adults can get an earlier start in their careers. I regret wasting my time not working when I could have been working and taking online classes. All play and no work makes students lazy… and broke :P

  10. Andrew T.

    Weaver, not to hijack this important discussion, but what are the errors of laissez faire? Nearly every service that government offers, competing institutions could offer more effectively. The idea of a “balance” of the scope of government is naive of the fact that once the legitimacy of government is established to maintain more than the sanctity of life, the slippery slope into total egalitarianism and socialism is already in place, and it is only a matter of time and continual regime change until that is the system that comes to exist. Case in point: the United States of America.

  11. Andrew T.

    Weaver, not to hijack this important discussion, but what are the errors of laissez faire? Nearly every service that government offers, competing institutions could offer more effectively. The idea of a “balance” of the scope of government is naive of the fact that once the legitimacy of government is established to maintain more than the sanctity of life, the slippery slope into total egalitarianism and sociailism is already in place, and it is only a matter of time and continual regime change until that is the system that comes to exist. Case in point: the United States of America.

  12. RonL

    I’m so happy I went to Columbia instead.
    Oh wait, they are celebrating the 1968 tomorrow and on the 28th.

    The whole Ivy League is infested.

  13. Andrew T.

    RonL,

    Tell me about it. Just a few weeks ago, my college hosted both the V-Monologues and Gloria Steinem in a radical feminist double whammy.

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